Zoechrome

Subtractive 3 color: Multi-layer printing

16 Images in 1 Gallery

Vericolor

Subtractive 2 color: unknown

40 Images

Ufacolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, mordant toning

136 Images in 7 Galleries

Trucolor 2 color

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, double-coated with dye couplers
“By the 1940s, most of the two-colour subtractive processes, apart from Cinecolor, were obsolete. The widespread use of the high-quality Technicolor process showed up the serious deficiencies in the simpler methods. The only significant new ...

Telco color subtractive 2 color

Subtractive 2 color: Split optics, side by side, duplitized film

1 Image

Technicolor No. II

Subtractive 2 color: 2 toned films cemented

The first subtractive 2 color process introduced by Technicolor captured the incoming light through a beam splitter with red and green filters also. However, in contrast to the first Technicolor process, the two b/w images were recorded on one negative strip. This was achieved by the pull-down of two frames simultaneously, a process that required the double speed in the camera. These two frames were arranged in pairs, whereby the green record was inverted up-side down (see image).

133 Images in 8 Galleries

Technic-Colour

Subtractive 2 color: Beam-splitter, duplitized

Talkicolor

Additive 2 color: Alternately stained
“Two-colour additive process Talkicolor was developed by Percy James Pearce along with Dr Anthony Bernardi who was also involved in the development of Raycol. The process was funded mainly by the author Elinor Glyn through her company Elinor ...

3 Images in 1 Gallery

Supercinecolor / Natural Color

Subtractive 3 color: Color separation, duplitized film, third layer added

Splendicolor

Subtractive 3 color: Beam-splitter, double-coated film, bichromated gelatin, Pinatype

Spectracolor (= British version of Ufacolor)

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, mordant toning

Sirius

Subtractive 2 color: Beam-splitter, double-coated
“The Dutch Sirius Color process (1929) used a camera with a beamsplitting system behind the lens to expose a single film, the film passing through two gates at right angles to each other. The double-coated print film was dye-toned. The process ...

139 Images in 3 Galleries

Sennett Color

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, double coated, toned
“Public showings of the work done at this plant in Hollywood have been given to Los Angeles audiences. The release prints are made on double sided film. Both sides are developed at one time and then toned red on one side and bluegreen on the ...

18 Images in 1 Gallery

Russian two-color system

Subtractive two color

1 Image

Rouxcolor 2 color / Cineoptichrome

Additive 2 color: Beam-splitter

2 Images

Rota Farbenfilm

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, mordant toning

13 Images in 2 Galleries

Raycol

Additive 2 color: Beam-splitter, sawn-off lens

13 Images in 1 Gallery

Procédé Colombier

Subtractive 3 color: Tri-pack
“M. F. de Colombier appears to have been the first to suggest the application of this system to cinematography, and like so many French patents it is a little indefinite in phraseology. Three films were employed representing the same view and ...

Prizma II

Subtractive 2 color: Toning on double coated film
“In its final form Prizma made use of duplitized positive film. As in previous Prizma systems, the original negatives were alternate frame sequential exposures. The Prizma negative was printed on both sides of the positive film in a special ...

399 Images in 14 Galleries

Prism

Additive 3 color: Prism

1 Image

Polychromide

Subtractive 2 color: Beam-splitter, later bi-pack, mordant dye
“Polychromide, a two-color subtractive process invented in 1918 by Aron Hamburger, achieved limited commercial success overseas, and was occasionally employed in England as late as 1933. Originally an orthochromatic and a panchromatic negative were ...

66 Images in 2 Galleries

Photocolor

Subtractive 2 color: Beam-splitter, double-coated

42 Images

Multicolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, duplitized
“In the Multicolor (two-color) subtractive process, two negative films are run simultaneously through any standard camera with their emulsion surfaces in contact. The front negative is orthochromatic, with the surface layer dyed orange-red to ...

74 Images in 6 Galleries

Monopack stripping

Subtractive 3 color: Monopack, stripping, still photography
“To offset the possible effects of poor contact between the various members of the tripack, J. H. Smith coated the emulsions directly one on top of the other, but with an insulating layer of collodion between them. In this manner there was ...

1 Image

Magnacolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, double-coated
“An American two-colour subtractive process still worked by the Consolidated Film Industries division of Republic Pictures Corporation. This concern was licensed by the owners of the “Prizma” patents, which it will be remembered was ...

23 Images in 2 Galleries

Magnachrome

Additive 2 color: Bi-pack, half-size

Kodachrome Two-color 1915, after 1930 renamed Fox Nature Color

Subtractive 2 color process: Beam-splitter, double-coated film

The Kodachrome process was invented in 1913 by John G. Capstaff for still photography and subsequently adapted to motion pictures. For the process two frames were advanced simultaneously, one located above the other. The light passed either through two lenses or through a beam-splitter, fitted with red and green filters. The release print was exposed through a beam-splitter whereby the alternate frames were projected onto either side of double-coated stock. After development by a usual b/w process, the film was tanned to harden the exposed areas. The soft areas were dyed red-orange and blue-green respectively.

350 Images in 12 Galleries

Jumeaux/Davidson

Additive 3 color: Prism

2 Images

Horst

Additive 3 color: Beam-splitter, 65 mm negative

4 Images in 1 Gallery

Hirlicolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack

2 Images