Kodachrome II

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal, 16 mm, 25 to 40 ASA
Kodachrome II was introduced in 1961. It was the first film stock since 1936 that was specifically meant for amateur use. Eastman Kodak presented the material as superior to the ‘regular Kodachrome’. It supposedly had a higher speed of 25 ...

84 Images in 5 Galleries

Kodachrome Commercial Type 5268

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal, 16 mm
In 1946 Kodachrome Commercial camera film Type 5268 was introduced. This stock had a lower-contrast emulsion and became leading in the professional field until it was replaced by Ektachrome Commercial type 7255 in 1958. Both Commercial Kodachrome and ...

Kodachrome Color Reversal Film Type 5262

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal, 16 mm
Although Kodachrome 16mm reversal film was introduced as an amateur film format, rapidly after its introduction it became a format frequently used by (semi-)professional film makers. The reason was that Kodachrome was a relatively easy to use film ...

Kodachrome Color Reversal Film 5265

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal, 16 mm
Duplicating stock for reversal film. Replaced Kodachrome duplicating stock type 5262. Contrary to its predecessor the new stock was not suited as camera material. Type 5265 could only be used for duplication.

Kodachrome

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal, 8 and 16 mm

“In 1930 Mannes and Godowsky were invited to join the staff of the Kodak Research Laboratory, where they concentrated on methods of processing multilayer films, while their colleagues worked out ways of manufacturing them. The result was the new Kodachrome film, launched in 1935. Three very thin emulsion layers were coated on film base, the emulsions being sensitised with non-wandering dyes to red, green and blue light, the red-sensitive layer being at the bottom.” (Coe, Brian (1978): Colour Photography. The First Hundred Years 1840-1940. London: Ash & Grant, pp. 121 ff.)

92 Images in 6 Galleries

Kislyn color

Additive 3 color: Lenticular screen

1 Image

Kingston Process

Additive three color process: rotary filters
Three black-and-white color separations were printed consecutively on one film strip and projected through the corresponding color filters, thus combining to one color image on screen.

Kinemacolor

Additive 2 color: Rotary filter

Kinemacolor was an additive process operated with alternating red and green filters that were applied to the shutter in front of the camera and in front of the projector. With at least 32 fps the frame rate was double the minimal frame rate of 16 fps. Time parallax with small differences between the red and green record resulted in color fringes that became visible when objects or scenes were moving.

13 Images in 3 Galleries

Kesdacolor

Subtractive 2 color: Line screen filter, duplitized film stock
”The process as illustrated in USP 1431309 was a two-color additive process, but it is stated that it could be a three- or four-color process. For the original photography, the negative was exposed through a line screen composed of alternate bands ...

1 Image

Kelleycolor

Subtractive 2 color: Dye transfer
“In 1919 Kelley produced a series of coloured cartoons which were drawn by Pinto Colvig. In 1924 he introduced “Kelleycolor,” which was an imbibition process. Two colours were imbibed on a black-and-white key image. In 1926 he ...

1 Image

Keller-Dorian

Additive 3 color: Lenticular screen

14 Images in 2 Galleries

Katachromie

Subtractive 3 color: Monopack silver dye-bleach, still photography
Karl Schinzel proposed a multi-layered monopack for still photography, based on the principle of the dye-bleach process which was later elaborated to a practical application with Gasparcolor.

Jumeaux/Davidson

Additive 3 color: Prism

2 Images

Joly

Additive 3 color: Line screen process, still photography
“In 1894 Professor John Joly of Dublin patented a process for producing a screen of red, green and blue-violet lines by ruling them on a gelatin-coated glass plate. Joly used ruling machines of great accuracy, with drawing pens trailed across ...

7 Images

Isensee

Additive 3 color: Rotary filter
“The first patent that has been found was granted to H. Isensee and he placed in front of the lens, both in taking and projection, a rotary shutter with three 120 degrees sectors in the usual colors.” (Wall, E.J. (1925): The History of ...

2 Images

Irix-Farbenfilm

Subtractive three-color process: imbibition
Three matrices in the subtractive primary colors are printed on the gelatin of the final print. Supposedly, the used dyes were particularly fast and able to prevent color bleeding. Pokorny started working on color cinematography in the 1920s, often ...

Iriscolor

Subtractive 3 color: Beam-splitter camera, imbibition printing
Similar to Technicolor, the Iriscolor process needed a special beam-splitter camera for exposing three black-and-white negatives on Kodak film stock. These negatives were used for imbibition printing. Between 1940 and 1942, Tobis Tonbild-Syndikat AG ...

Indu Colour

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

2 Images

Hydrotypie / Hydrotype / dye transfer

Subtractive 3 color: Dye transfer, still photography
“In the imbibition process, a dye image is transferred from a gelatin relief image to a receiving layer made either of paper or film. Charles Cros described this method of “hydrotypie” transfer printing in 1880 and suggested it ...

Horst

Additive 3 color: Beam-splitter, 65 mm negative

4 Images in 1 Gallery

Hirlicolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack

2 Images

Hillman Process

Additive 3 color: Rotary filter, mirror system with two lenses

3 Images

Hérault Trichrome

Additive 3 color: Alternately stained in red, green and blue
“The Hérault Trichrome process was demonstrated in Paris on 1 October 1926, with three films made by A. Rodde — a fashion show, a documentary on Brittany and a tableau of the Legend of the King of Ys. Hérault Trichrome was an extension of ...

12 Images in 1 Gallery

Harriscolor

Subtractive 2 color: Beam-splitter, single-coated
“Harriscolor In this method as in other methods of color photography, independent color value negatives are first obtained. The Harriscolor process can employ one of the following two methods: Either a camera wherein the dividing light prisms ...

3 Images

Harmonicolor

Subtractive 2 color: Bi-pack, double-coated
“Harmonicoior was developed by French chemist Maurice Combes. It was first formally demonstrated in London by Harmonicoior Films Ltd, of 4 Great Winchester Street, on the 23 March 1936 at the Curzon Soho with the film Talking Hands, produced at ...

Handschiegl / DeMille-Wyckoff / Wyckoff Process

Applied color: Imbibition
Similar to stenciling, the Handschiegl process was applied mechanically to manually defined image parts. Therefore it is an applied color process. After the film was shot and edited, for each color applied a separate print was made. In contrast to ...

141 Images in 8 Galleries

Hand coloring

Applied colors: Manual application

Coloring of individual frames by the use of very fine brushes. The process was previously applied to lantern slides. Any water based translucent dye was suited for the process, most often the coloring was done with acid dyes.

250 Images in 18 Galleries

Gualtierotti or Cicona e Gualtierotti

Additive two-color: optical system, filters, 64mm negative.
Unlike other additive systems invented in previous years, Gualtierotti tried to avoid the phenomenon of chromatic aberration inherent in the use of multiple lenses or the creation of successive separation records. The proposed solution was based on ...

1 Image

Gorsky Process

Gilmore Color

Additive 2 color: Rotary filter
“Gilmore’s two-color additive process was based on a patent granted to F. E. Ives in 1918. A unique optical system exposed two images in pairs, and quarter-turned them lengthwise side by side on standard 35 mm film stock. One of the images was ...

1 Image

Gevaert Positif Color

Applied colors: Pretinted film

Gevacolor T 6 82

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 80

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 55

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 54

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 53

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 52

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor T 6 51

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor Print Film T 9 86

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor Print Film T 9 85

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor Positive Film T 9 54

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor Positive Film T 9 53

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

Gevacolor Negative

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack

4 Images in 1 Gallery

Gevachrome

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack, reversal 16mm

10 Images in 1 Gallery

Gaumont Chronochrome

Additive 3 color: Sawn-off lenses and filters, simultaneous taking and projection
“The competition between Kinemacolor and other rival systems was partially stimulated by a Utopian faith in the potential of film technology to achieve ‘natural colour’, reality ‘as it is’ being the goal of the cinematic ...

12 Images in 2 Galleries

Gasparcolor OR Gaspar Color

Subtractive 3 color: Silver dye-bleach multilayer print film

Gasparcolor was the first three-color multi-layer monopack film available for practical use. It was a double-coated print film with a cyan layer on one side and two layers dyed magenta and yellow on the other side (see illustrations).

401 Images in 24 Galleries

Gaspar Color subtractive 2 color

Subtractive 2 color: Silver dye-bleach

Fullcolor

Subtractive 2 colors: Bi-pack, duplitized film

Fujicolor Positive, type 8819

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack
See also Fujicolor.

Fujicolor Positive, type 8818

Subtractive 3 color: Chromogenic monopack
See also Fujicolor.